Sentence Correction — 2

Test
Materials

1) The noun of the possessive case (Ahmed’s, Sheela’s) or the pronoun of the possessive case (mine, ours, theirs, his, her etc.) comes just before that noun for which it is used.

(a) His all books were burnt. (Incorrect)
All his books were burnt. (Correct)
(b) His both hands are skinny. (Incorrect)
Both his hands are skinny. (Correct)
(c) Ahmed’s all hopes were gone. (Incorrect)
All Ahmed’s hopes were gone. (Correct)

2) An adjective of superlative degree is used when the noun it qualifies shows the possession of a quality to a higher degree than any other member of the same class.

(a) This is a best book. (Incorrect)
This is good book. (Correct)
(b) He is a worst scholar. (Incorrect)
He is a very bad scholar. (Correct)

3) ‘Later’ is the comparative of ‘late’. It means ‘more late in time’, ‘after wards’. But ‘latter’ is the opposite of ‘former’. It means ‘the second of two people or things just mentioned’. ‘Later’ denotes time whereas ‘latter’ denotes position.

(a) He came latter than you. (Incorrect)
He came later than you. (Correct)
(b) If offered red or white shirt I’d choose the later. (Incorrect)
If offered red or white shirt, I would choose the latter. (Correct)
(c) I will see you latter. (Incorrect)
I will see you later. (Correct)

4) Farther means ‘at or to a great distance or more distant point’. ‘Further’ means ‘more’, ‘additional’.

(a) Have you any farther questions to ask? (Incorrect)
Have you any further questions to ask? (Correct)
(b) He made no farther remarks. (Incorrect)
He made no further remarks. (Correct)
(c) Let’s not walk any further. (Incorrect)
Let’s not walk any farther. (Correct)

5) To give more information about the action – to say how, where or when it is done – we use adverbs with verbs. When the quality of the subject rather than the action of the verb is to be expressed, we use adjective with a verb. It is the smell of the flower that has been described in the second sentence. Hence the use of the adjective ‘sweet’, not the adverb ‘sweetly’.

(a) She sings beautiful. (Incorrect)
She sings beautifully. (Correct)
(b) This flower smells sweetly. (Incorrect)
This flower smells sweet. (Correct)

6) ‘Hard’ is both an adjective and adverb. Its meaning is quite different from ‘hardly’ which is also an adverb. ‘Hardly’ means ‘almost no’ or ‘almost not’. The correct expression is ‘be hard pressed’ which means ‘be under pressure strained’.

(a) He hit the ball hardly. (Incorrect)
He hit the ball hard. (Correct)
(b) You have to work hardly. (Incorrect)
You have to work hard. (Correct)
(c) He has got hard any money. (Incorrect)
He has got hardly any money. (Correct)
(d) He is hardly pressed for time. (Incorrect)
He is hard pressed for time. (Correct)

7) The ‘two first’ is a meaningless expression. It implies that two things may be first. It makes no sense. The correct expression is ‘the first two’.

(a) The two first pages of this book are torn. (Incorrect)
The first two pages of this book are torn. (Correct)
(b) The two first chapters of this book are good. (Incorrect)
The first two chapters of this book are good. (Correct)

8) We should not put adverbs between the verb and its object. These are not generally separated.

(a) He speaks well English. (Incorrect)
He speaks English well. (Correct)
(b) I like very much skating. (Incorrect)
I like skating very much.
Or, I very much like skating. (Correct)

9) Adverbs of definite time are put at the beginning or end of a clause. They do not go in mid-position.

(a) I yesterday met him. (Incorrect)
I met him yesterday. (Correct)
(b) They’re tomorrow leaving for Paris. (Incorrect)
Tomorrow they’re leaving for Paris. (Correct)

10) When we use an adverb to evaluate, it generally goes in end-position, not in mid-position.

(a) You well organised that function. (Incorrect)
You organised that function well. (Correct)
(b) She badly dances. (Incorrect)
She dances badly. (Correct)

11) ‘Very’ is used with adjectives and adverbs in the positive degree and with present participle whereas ‘much’ is used with adjectives and adverbs in the comparative degree, and with past participle.

(a) She is very slower than Reena. (Incorrect)
She is much slower than Reena. (Correct)
(b) You are very older than me. (Incorrect)
You are much older than me. (Correct)
(c) She was walking much slowly. (Incorrect)
She was walking very slowly. (Correct)

12) We usually use the adverb ‘but’ (not, than) after ‘else’.

(a) It is nothing else than pride. (Incorrect)
It is nothing else but pride. (Correct)
(b) Call me anything else than a thief. (Incorrect)
Call me anything else but a thief. (Correct)

13) ‘Ever’ usually means ‘at any time’. It cannot go with ‘seldom’ which means ‘not often, rarely’. The correct expression is ‘seldom or never’, or ‘seldom if ever’.

(a) He seldom or ever goes to his village home. (Incorrect)
He seldom or never goes to his village home. (Correct)
(b) He seldom or ever plays cricket. (Incorrect)
He seldom if ever (seldom or never) plays cricket. (Correct)

14) In expressions like these, ‘use’ is followed by an ‘-ing’ form. The correct expression is, it or there is no use + -ing form of verb.

(a) It is no use to ask her — she is not interested in it. (Incorrect)
It is no use asking her — she is not interested in it. (Correct)
(b) Is it any use to try to talk to him? (Incorrect)
Is it any use trying to talk to him? (Correct)

15) ‘Keep on’ is never followed by an infinitive. It is always followed by the ‘-ing’ form of verb.

(a) His mother kept on to encourage him to study. (Incorrect)
His mother kept on encouraging him to study. (Correct)
(b) Whatever happens, keep on to try. (Incorrect)
Whatever happens, keep on trying. (Correct)

16) ‘Know’ is never followed directly by an infinitive. We generally use the expression ‘know how to’.

(a) She knows to sing and dance. (Incorrect)
She knows how to sing and dance. (Correct)
(b) He knows to prepare French toast. (Incorrect)
He knows how to prepare French toast. (Correct)

17) After some verbs we use an -ing form, and not an infinitive. Here is the list of verbs which are followed by an -ing form.

avoid, forgive, miss, consider, give up, practise, delay, go, put off, dislike, (can’t) help risk, enjoy, imagine, spend money/time, excuse, keep, suggest, feel like, mind, understand, finish.

(a) He has finished to mend the puncture. (Incorrect)
He has finished mending the puncture. (Correct)
(b) I enjoy to travel. (Incorrect)
I enjoy travelling. (Correct)

18) Some verbs are never used in progressive forms. Here is the list of some of the most important ‘non-progressive’ verbs.

1. Relational Verbs: appear, belong to, consist of, contain, equal, fit, include, owe, require, resemble, seem, suffice
2. Verbs of Emotion: adore, abhor, care, detest, dislike, hate, like, love, wish
3. Verbs of Perception: hear, see, smell, taste
4. Verbs of Possession: have, own, possess
5. Verbs of Cognition: believe, feel, forget, know, mean, mind, realise, recall, recollect, remember, suppose, think, trust, understand

(a) Why is she appearing so sad? (Incorrect)
Why does she appear so sad? (Correct)
(b) I am owing a great deal to my parents. (Incorrect)
I owe a great deal to my parents. (Correct)
(c) I am not feeling well today. (Incorrect)
I am not well today. (Correct)
(d) He is adoring that political leader. (Incorrect)
He adores that political leader. (Correct)

19) The present form of a verb cannot be used for both the present perfect tense and the future indefinite tense. The present perfect tense takes the past participle form of the verb (bear; bore; borne; do; did; done) and the future indefinite takes the present form of the verb.

(a) I have not and shall not bear this trouble. (Incorrect)
I have not borne and shall not bear this trouble. (Correct)
(b) I have never and will never do such a thing. (Incorrect)
I have never done and shall never do such a thing. (Correct)

20) The word ‘hang’ has two different meanings: (i) to kill a person by hanging; (ii) to suspend from or attach loosely to some other object. The two different forms of the verb ‘hang’ are.

V1   :  V2  :    V3
Hang : Hanged : Hanged (for persons)
Hang : Hung : Hung (for things)

(a) He hanged the lamp on the wall. (Incorrect)
He hung the lamp on the wall. (Correct)
(b) He was hung for murder. (Incorrect)
He was hanged for murder. (Correct)

21) ‘Half past twelve’ is a time expression. We say, ‘It is half past twelve by my watch’. It is never used for denoting the price of something. We usually say, ‘rupees twelve and fifty paise’. The use of the verbs in the sentences above is wrong.

(a) This book costed me half past twelve rupees. (Incorrect)
This book cost me rupees twelve and fifty paise. (Correct)
(b) The hens have lain no eggs today. (Incorrect)
The hens have laid no eggs today. (Correct)
(c) Let me lay on the bed. (Incorrect)
Let me lie on the bed. (Correct)

The correct past and perfect forms of certain verbs are as given below:

Present : Past : Perfect
lie (rest) : lay : lain
lay (arrange, deposit) : laid : laid
lie (to tell a lie) : lied : lied
leave (go away) :  left : left
live (be alive) :  lived : lived
flow (water) : flowed : flowed
fly (bird) : flew : flown
flee (run away – person) : fled : fled
bear (put up with) : bore : borne
bore (to make a hole; to make tired or uninterested) : bored  : bored
find (to discover) : found : found
found (to establish) : founded : founded
fall (lose one’s balance and collapse.) : fell : fallen
fell (to cut down (a tree); to knock down (a person) : felled : felled

22)  To avoid such silly mistakes, it is well to remember that:
return = come back; await = wait for; repay = pay back; resume = start again

(a) He has returned back from Karachi. (Incorrect)
He has returned (come back) from Karachi. (Correct)
(b) I awaited for his arrival (Incorrect)
I awaited (waited for) his arrival. (Correct)
(c) He has repaid back his loan. (Incorrect)
He has repaid (paid back) his loan. (Correct)

23) A boat capsizes or sinks; a ship sinks; a person is drowned. ‘To be drowned’ is used only of living things.

(a) The boat was drowned in the river. (Incorrect)
The boat was sunk in the river. (Correct)
(b) A boy has been sunk in the river. (Incorrect)
A boy has been drowned in the river. (Correct)

24) ‘To invent’ is to make something that did not exist before. ‘To discover’ is to find something that existed before but was unknown.

(a) Who invented America? (Incorrect)
Who discovered America? (Correct)
(b) Marconi discovered the wireless. (Incorrect)
Marconi invented the wireless. (Correct)

25) When we talk about events which are not certain to happen – which we hope will happen, or imagine might happen or want to happen – we use a special group of verb-forms called the subjunctive (e.g., I were, She be, etc.) The subjunctive form ‘were’ is used instead of ‘was’ after ‘if’, ‘as if’, and ‘I wish’.

(a) If I was you I would not have done so. (Incorrect)
If I were you I would not have done so. (Correct)
(b) He walks as if he is a king. (Incorrect)
He walks as if he were a king. (Correct)

26) ‘Neither….nor’ is used to join together two negative ideas. This structure is balanced, so that the same kind of words follow neither and nor.

(a) Neither his action was just nor unjust. (Incorrect)
His action was neither just nor unjust. (Correct)
(b) I neither saw him nor her. (Incorrect)
I saw neither him nor her. (Correct)
(c) Neither it is good nor it is bad. (Incorrect)
It is neither good nor bad. (Correct)

27) The auxiliary verb is usually repeated if the voice or number of one principal verb is not the same as the voice or number of the other.

(a) Ten students have passed and one failed. (Incorrect)
Ten students have passed and one has failed. (Correct)
(b) One of the thieves escaped and two caught. (Incorrect)
One of the thieves escaped and two were caught. (Correct)

28) Indirect questions normally have the word-order of affirmative sentences. The auxiliary verb is never put before the subject.

(a) Tell me where are you going. (Incorrect)
Tell me where you are going. (Correct)
(b) He asked me what was your name. (Incorrect)
He asked me what my name was. (Correct)
(c) Tell me when are you leaving for New York. (Incorrect)
Tell me when you are leaving for New York. (Correct)

29) When two actions take place in the past, the one earlier in time is expressed by a verb in the past perfect tense, while the one later in time by that in the past simple tense.

(a) She finished her work when I met her. (Incorrect)
She had finished her work when I met her. (Correct)
(b) The train started before he reached the station. (Incorrect)
The train had started before he reached the station. (Correct)

30) We generally use the present instead of the future after if and conjunction of time such as when, as soon as, after, while, until, and before.

(a) They will be delighted if you will welcome them. (Incorrect)
They will be delighted if you welcome them. (Correct)
(b) I will tell you as soon as I will know about it. (Incorrect)
I will tell you as soon as I know about it. (Correct)
(c) When I shall go to Paris, I shall inform you. (Incorrect)
When I go to Paris, I shall inform you. (Correct)

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1) ‘Unless’ means ‘if not’. It should, therefore, be not used in a sentence or clause which is already negative. ‘Lest’ is here a subordinating conjunction expressing a negative purpose. It should not be followed by ‘not’.

(a) Unless you do not work hard, you will cut a sorry figure. (Incorrect)
Unless you work hard, you will cut a sorry figure. (Correct)
(b) Walk slowly lest you should not fall down. (Incorrect)
Walk slowly lest you should fall down. (Correct)

2) The past perfect tense is used with such verbs as hope, expect, think, intend, mean (= intend), suppose and want to indicate that a past hope, expectation, intention, desire, etc., was not realized.

(a) I thought of attending the party, but could not. (Incorrect)
I had thought of attending the party but could not. (Correct)
(b) We hoped that you would solve this problem. (Incorrect)
We had hoped that you would solve this problem. (Correct)
(c) I expected not such a turn of events. (Incorrect)
I had not expected such a turn of events. (Correct)

3) We do not usually used past perfect tense singly in a sentence. We can use simple past tense instead. When the verb ‘go’ is used in the sense of ‘go and come back from’, ‘been’ is used in place of ‘gone’.

(a) I had gone to Lahore. (Incorrect)
I went to Lahore. (Correct)
Or, I had been to Chandigarh. (Correct)
(b) I had slept for hours. (Incorrect)
I slept for hours. (Correct)

4) In affirmative sentence the singular form of dare/ need (that is, dares/needs) is used with singular subject. But need not and dare not admit of no change even if the subject is third person singular.

(a) He needs not seek my help. (Incorrect)
He need not seek my help. (Correct)
(b) She dares not walk in the dark. (Incorrect)
She dare not walk in the dark. (Correct)

5) Whether ‘a’ or ‘an’ is used before initials depends on how the initial is pronounced. A, E, F, H, I, L, M, N, O, R, S and X all begin with a vowel sound; hence an LEA School, an MA, an MP but a BBC production, a BA, a PhD, etc.

(a) We have filed a FIR. (Incorrect)
We have filed an FIR. (Correct)

(b) He has set up a X-ray plant. (Incorrect)
He has set up an X-ray plant. (Correct)

6) We use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, even if it is written with a vowel. When a word begins with ‘U’ and is pronounced as ‘yu’, or when a word begins with ‘EU’ and is pronounced as ‘yu’, or when a word begins with ‘o’ and is pronounced as ‘wa’, it is preceded by the article ‘a’ and not ‘an’. Such words are: unique, united, usual, European, useful, unit, universal, university, useless, one-eyed man, one-rupee not, unilateral, etc.

(a) He is an university professor. (Incorrect)
He is a university professor. (Correct)
(b) It is an unit of measurement. (Incorrect)
It is a unit of measurement. (Correct)
(c) It is an universal truth. (Incorrect)
It is a universal truth. (Correct)

7) The definite article ‘the’ is used before musical instruments. When ‘play’ means ‘produce music’, its object is always preceded by an article.

(a) He plays violin. (Incorrect)
He plays the violin. (Correct)
(b) Can you play tabla? (Incorrect)
Can you play the tabla? (Correct)

8) Sometimes a single preposition can’t be used for two words that take two different prepositions. In such a situation both the prepositions should be used.

(a) He has no knowledge and interest in music. (Incorrect)
He has no knowledge of and interest in music. (Correct)
(b) He did not agree but differed from my opinion. (Incorrect)
He did not agree to but differed from my opinion. (Correct)

9) We usually say, end to one’s troubles, busy with some work, send something to someone’s address.

(a) There is no end of troubles. (Incorrect)
There is no end to troubles. (Correct)
(b) I am busy in my work. (Incorrect)
I am busy with my work. (Correct)
(c) Send this letter on my address. (Incorrect)
Send this letter to my address. (Correct)

10) These sentences are examples of unattached participles. When the first word of a sentence is a participle, it must refer to some noun or pronoun it qualifies. That noun or pronoun should be the subject of the main clause.

(a) Entering the room, the boys were found quarrelling. (Incorrect)
Entering the room, he found the boys quarrelling. (Correct)
(b) Walking in the garden, a snake bit him. (Incorrect)
While he was walking in the garden, a snake bit him. (Correct)
(c) Barking furiously I led the dog out of the compound. (Incorrect)
I led the dog, barking furiously, out of the compound. (Correct)
(d) Going out of the room, the door was left open by her. (Incorrect)
Going out of the room, she left open the door. (Correct)
(e) On examining the answer books, many silly mistakes were detected. (Incorrect)
On examining the answer books, we detected many silly mistakes. (Correct)

11) We usually leave out to, the sign of infinitive, after sensory verbs like feel, hear, see, observe, perceive, mark, behold, survey, view, watch.

(a) I saw her to go. (Incorrect)
I saw her go. (Correct)
(b) I observed him to limp. (Incorrect)
I observed him limp. (Correct)

12) An infinitive is generally not used after words which take a preposition after them. Such words are:
Verbs: insist, object, prevent, succeed, think.
Nouns: insistence, objection, intention, habit, resistance, view
Adjectives: equal, fond, tired, used
The infinitives should be changed into the corresponding gerunds.

(a) He insisted to go. (Incorrect)
He insisted on going. (Correct)
(b) I am tired to sing and dance. (Incorrect)
I am tired of singing and dancing. (Correct)
(c) He succeeded to win the match. (Incorrect)
He succeeded in winning the match. (Correct)

13) The infinitives are changed into the corresponding gerunds after certain words which do not take prepositions after them.
Such words are:
Verbs: avoid, enjoy, finish, go on, keep on, mind, remember, can’t help, stop, give up
Adjectives: busy, worth

(a) Avoid to go there. (Incorrect)
Avoid going there. (Correct)
(b) Stop to worry. (Incorrect)
Stop worrying. (Correct)
(c) Keep on to try. (Incorrect)
Keep on trying. (Correct)
(d) He is busy to write letters. (Incorrect)
He is busy writing letters. (Correct)

14) The infinitive is changed into the corresponding gerund after such phrases as these: It is no use, It is no good, Have the pleasure of, There is no harm in.

(a) It is no good to cry over spilt milk. (Incorrect)
It is no good crying over spilt milk. (Correct)
(b) There is no harm to do this work. (Incorrect)
There is no harm in doing this work. (Correct)

15) Though preferable is not a comparative yet it has a comparative force. It is, therefore, wrong to write ‘more preferable’. Prefer takes ‘to’, not ‘than’.

(a) Death is more preferable than dishonour. (Incorrect)
Death is preferable to dishonour. (Correct)
(b) I prefer swimming than walking. (Incorrect)
I prefer swimming to walking. (Correct)

16) Certain verbs are always followed by ‘as’. Such verbs are: describe, depict, define, mention, portray, regard, represent, treat.

(a) He regards me his guardian. (Incorrect)
He regards me as his guardian. (Correct)
(b) They portrayed Imran Khan a dictator. (Incorrect)
They portrayed Imran Khan as a dictator. (Correct)

17) Certain verbs are not followed by ‘as’ or ‘to be’. Such verbs are: appoint, choose, elect, call, consider, make, name, think.

(a) She called me as a dullard. (Incorrect)
She called me a dullard. (Correct)
(b) He was appointed as principal. (Incorrect)
He was appointed principal. (Correct)

18) We usually avoid the use of present tense after ‘as if’ and ‘as though’.

(a) She looks as if she suspects foul play. (Incorrect)
She looks as if she suspected foul play. (Correct)
(b) You act as though everything is in your hands. (Incorrect)
You act as though everything was in your hands. (Correct)

19) We usually use the infinitive without ‘to’ after the preposition ‘but’ and ‘than’.

(a) He did nothing but to play. (Incorrect)
He did nothing but play. (Correct)
(b) She did nothing but to sing. (Incorrect)
She did nothing but sing. (Correct)
(c) She did no more than to cry. (Incorrect)
She did no more than cry. (Correct)

20) The future simple is not used in time clauses. The simple present tense is used instead. Nor is future perfect tense used in time clauses. The present perfect is used instead.

(a) She will wash up before she will go to bed. (Incorrect)
She will wash up before she goes to bed. (Correct)
(b) You won’t know how good pudding is till you will have tasted it. (Incorrect)
You won’t know how good pudding is till you have tasted it. (Correct)

21) The verb governed by ‘who’ should follow its antecedent. In the first sentence the antecedent is ‘I’. Hence the verb ‘am’. In the second sentence the antecedent is ‘you’. Hence the verb ‘are’.

(a) It is I who is responsible for this mistake. (Incorrect)
It is I who am responsible for this mistake. (Correct)

(b) It is you who is responsible for this mistake. (Incorrect)
It is you who are responsible for this mistake. (Correct)

22) Both the sentences are examples of wrong word order impeding clarity of expression. It is well to remember that an adjective, adjective-substitute or adjective phrase should be put as near its antecedent as possible. This applies to relative clauses, too.

(a) I want an armchair for an old man with sliding back. (Incorrect)
I want, for an old man, an armchair with sliding back. (Correct)
(b) He shot himself dead after bidding his wife goodbye with a pistol. (Incorrect)
He shot himself dead with a pistol after bidding his wife goodbye. (Correct)

23) If anybody, anyone, everybody, everyone, somebody, someone, nobody or no one is the subject of the main clause, the subject of the question tag is normally ‘they’. If the main clause is in the form of a negative request or command, the question tag normally begins with ‘will’. The question tag after ‘I am’ is ‘aren’t I’.

(a) No body has over helped you, has he? (Incorrect)
Nobody has ever helped you, have they? (Correct)
(b) Don’t do that any more, do you? (Incorrect)
Don’t do that any more, will you? (Correct)
(c) I am taller than him, isn’t I? (Incorrect)
I am taller than him, aren’t I? (Correct)

24) In the present context the expression, ‘cold glass’, ‘fresh basket’ and ‘hot cup’ are meaningless. The adjectives cold, fresh and hot qualify the noun ‘water’, ‘apples’ and ‘tea’ respectively. Hence the correct expressions will be cold water, fresh apples and hot tea.

(a) Bring a cold glass of water. (Incorrect)
Bring a glass of cold water. (Correct)
(b) He has purchased a fresh basket of apples. (Incorrect)
He has purchased a basket of fresh apples. (Correct)
(c) I’d love to have a hot cup of tea. (Incorrect)
I’d love to have a cup of hot tea. (Correct)

25) The present perfect tense can alone be used with adverbials such as these: already, since, yet, so far, up till now.

(a) He already left for Hyderabad. (Incorrect)
He has already left for Hyderabad. (Correct)
(b) He did not speak to me since that incident. (Incorrect)
He has not spoken to me since that incident. (Correct)
(c) He did not receive any message up till now. (Incorrect)
He has not received any message up till now. (Correct)
(d) So far he did not reach the station. (Incorrect)
So far he has not reached the station. (Correct)

26) Only the simple past can be used with adverbials mentioning a definite time in the past.

(a) This tragic incident has taken place last year. (Incorrect)
This tragic incident took place last year. (Correct)
(b) She has gone to bed at 9 o’ clock. (Incorrect)
She went to bed at 9 o’ clock. (Correct)
(c) I have met him yesterday. (Incorrect)
I met him yesterday. (Correct)

27) When ‘marry’ is used in the sense of ‘take as husband or wife’, it can never be used in the passive form. It can be used both in the active and passive forms in the sense of ‘give in marriage’. It is to be followed by ‘to’, not ‘with’.

(a) Arisha was married by Aamir. (Incorrect)
Arisha married Aamir. (Correct)
(b) He married his youngest daughter with an engineer. (Incorrect)
He married his youngest daughter to an engineer. (Correct)
(c) His youngest daughter was married with an engineer. (Incorrect)
His youngest daughter was married to an engineer. (Correct)

28) When the name of a vehicle is used in a general sense, the preposition ‘by’ is used. In all such cases no article is used before the name of the vehicle. If the reference is to a particular vehicle, ‘by’ is not used. We use ‘in’ or ‘on’ instead.

(a) She comes to college by a bicycle. (Incorrect)
She comes to college by bicycle. (Correct)
Or, She comes to college on a bicycle. (Correct)
(b) He came back by my car. (Incorrect)
He came back in my car. (Correct)

29) ‘Supposing’ and ‘If’ are not used together. Either of the two should be used.

(a) Supposing if he does not come, what will you do? (Incorrect)
Supposing he does not come, what will you do? (Correct)
OR, If be does not come, what will you do? (Correct)

30) The verbs assure, inform, remind and tell are not immediately followed by that–clause as their object. There has to be an indirect object between the verb and the clause.

(a) He informed that everybody had gone against him. (Incorrect)
He informed me (us, him, them, etc.) that everybody had gone against him. (Correct)
(b) She told that she was interested in chess. (Incorrect)
She told me (us, him, them etc.) that she was interested in chess. (Correct)
(c) He assured that every help would be given. (Incorrect)
He assured me (us, him, them, etc.) that every help would be given. (Correct)